A foster friend can help isolation period

Ailish DelaneyBunbury Herald
BARRC committee members Patricia Perks, Rachael Cronin, Jenni Marns, Casey Woodward and Sally Dixon, front, celebrate their first anniversary.
Camera IconBARRC committee members Patricia Perks, Rachael Cronin, Jenni Marns, Casey Woodward and Sally Dixon, front, celebrate their first anniversary. Credit: Supplied/Sarah Walsh

Bunbury Animal Rescue Rehome Care is encouraging those spending more time at home to look into fostering a new furry friend.

BARRC dog coordinator Sally Dixon said although they had not noticed a greater surge in requests to help dogs find new homes, there was always a constant number of dogs requiring rehoming through pounds and community members who were no longer able to care for them.

“We are a foster-based rescue which means that all our dogs are placed into foster care homes, where the family looks after the dog and treats it like a family member whilst BARRC take care of all the expenses such as food and vet care,” Ms Dixon said.

Fostering a dog not only allows a dog to reach their full potential whilst in a comfortable and caring environment, it also offers the fostering individual or family the chance to not just save a life but to receive companionship, exercise and meet new friends.

Sally Dixon

Ms Dixon said BARRC repeatedly heard wonderful feedback from foster carers who said fostering taught children valuable lessons and provided companionship and new friendships.

“Most fear the risk of falling for their foster and wanting to adopt, however, in most cases, when they meet the adopting family they realise there is someone else out there who can provide the same love and care for the dog,” she said.

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