Detectives probe Lisa Mott’s disappearance 40 years on

Headshot of Ailish Delaney
Ailish DelaneyBunbury Herald
Email Ailish Delaney
Special crime squad homicide Detective-Superintendent Rod Wilde with Detective-Inspector Gary Nicolau, officer-in-charge special homicide squad Detective Senior Sergeant Tony Rosenberg and acting Detective Senior Sergeant Ryan Murphy visited Collie on Friday for the 40-year anniversary of Lisa Mott's disappearance.
Camera IconSpecial crime squad homicide Detective-Superintendent Rod Wilde with Detective-Inspector Gary Nicolau, officer-in-charge special homicide squad Detective Senior Sergeant Tony Rosenberg and acting Detective Senior Sergeant Ryan Murphy visited Collie on Friday for the 40-year anniversary of Lisa Mott's disappearance. Credit: Ailish Delaney/South Western Times/Ailish Delaney

Cold case detectives visited Collie last week to gather more information about the disappearance and suspected murder of 12-year-old Lisa Mott, who vanished from the town 40 years ago on Friday.

Special crime squad detectives manned a mobile policing facility in the hope community members would come forward with more information about Lisa’s disappearance.

The State Government announced a $1 million reward for information that helped police apprehend the person or persons behind Lisa’s suspected murder and can end “four decades of heartache for her family”.

Special Crime Squad Detective Superintendent Rod Wilde is calling on the community to reach out if they know anything.
Camera IconSpecial Crime Squad Detective Superintendent Rod Wilde is calling on the community to reach out if they know anything. Credit: Ailish Delaney / Bunbury Herald

Detective-Superintendent Rod Wilde said Lisa’s disappearance was a significant event in both Collie and WA’s history.

“It’s a 12-year-old child that we’re talking about the disappearance and suspected murder of,” Det.-Supt Wilde said.

“About 9.30pm on (October 30) 40 years ago, Lisa was at the basketball courts watching some friends play basketball ... she left the courts and hasn’t been seen since.

“Although it’s been a long time, it’s about that person that may have been close to the offender that has that information that for whatever reason hasn’t come forward.

“We know circumstances change, people’s allegiances change and $1 million is a lot of money — it’s a life-changing opportunity for someone.”

Det.-Supt Wilde said it was important for Lisa’s mother, Marion Flowers, to finally have closure.

He asked people to come forward with any possible information and to leave it to the police to judge how relevant it may be.

Marion Powell in Adelaide holds a photograph of her missing daughter Lisa Mott that disappeared in 1980. Wednesday 27th of October 2010. WESTERN AUSTRALIAN NEWS
Camera IconMarion Powell in Adelaide holds a photograph of her missing daughter Lisa Mott that disappeared in 1980. Wednesday 27th of October 2010. WESTERN AUSTRALIAN NEWS Credit: By David Mariuz

Ms Flowers said Lisa was a thoughtful girl with a lovely nature.

“If you are still out there Lisa somewhere, I still love you to bits,” she said.

“I can’t talk about Lisa very much as it still hurts too much, I have to stay in the present.

“My only hope is after all this time that somebody is still alive that might know something.”

Get the latest news from thewest.com.au in your inbox.

Sign up for our emails