Not enough being done to keep banded lapwings: Treendale resident

Ailish DelaneyBunbury Herald
Treendale resident Michelle Hastings is calling for more action to help protect the banded lapwings.
Camera IconTreendale resident Michelle Hastings is calling for more action to help protect the banded lapwings. Credit: Ailish Delaney / Bunbury Herald

A Treendale resident is calling for more action to protect a bird species nesting in the area.

There is a designated area for the banded lapwings — a small native bird that lives in open grasslands — to nest opposite Bunnings Australind, but Michelle Hastings is worried not enough is done to protect them.

“There’s a small area for the birds to nest on the ground, but all the grass around it has been cut so it’s not tall enough for them to hide or get shade,” she said.

“There will be no cover or protection once the chicks hatch.

“These birds were in abundance a couple of years ago, however there is one nesting pair left.”

A banded lapwing at the small patch of unmown grass where it is nesting.
Camera IconA banded lapwing at the small patch of unmown grass where it is nesting. Credit: Ailish Delaney / Bunbury Herald

Ms Hastings also voiced concerns about domestic cats she had seen roaming the area.

“Cats are showing up in the area where the banded lapwing signs are ... they pose a threat to the birds and the future chicks,” she said.

I drive and walk around Treendale, Leschenault and other areas in Australind where bushland is in close proximity and find the number of cats sighted in bushland day and night shocking.

Harvey shire president Paul Gillett said council staff were aware of the issues surrounding the lapwings and had sought advice from Bird Life Bunbury.

“Shire staff have implemented a number of measures to ensure that the lapwing birds are protected in the current environment ... including installing rock gardens and planting shade shrubs to create a safe habitat for the birds,” he said.

“Road signs have been installed to alert motorists to drive with caution through the area.

“When the parks and gardens staff mow the area they place cones around the nesting areas to protect the birds.”

Mr Gillett said it was up to owners to ensure their cats were registered and did not harm wildlife or become a nuisance to neighbours.

“Owners must ensure that their cat remains on their property and ... is kept inside at night,” Mr Gillett said.

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