Corella culls appear to be successful

Jacinta CantatoreHarvey-Waroona Reporter
Pic from Lea Scaddan/ Magnus News. Pic shows a pair of Australian Corellas playing on a swing in a children’s playgorund in Perth, WA, on October 8. pictures@magnusnewsagency.com +44(0)1215371514 Magnus News Agency +44(0)1215371514 newsdesk@magnusnewsagency.com THESE AUSTRALIAN BIRDS ARE SURE GETTING INTO THE SWING OF THINGS LARKING AROUND IN A CHILDREN’S PLAYGROUND WITH PIX By Richard Ashmore These birds sure look like they are getting into the SWING of things larking around in a children’s playground. The corellas – which are related to cockatoos – were spotted appearing to push one another on the swing in these images taken in Perth, Western Australia, on October 8. Like their larger cockatoo cousins, corellas are renowned for their playful nature which is so important for a social bird to reinforce relationships. Graphic designer Lea Scaddan was taking some morning bird photographs when she spotted a flock head to the playground. Lea, from Perth, said seeing the two birds on the swing she knew she had to try and get some shots. She said: "It wasn’t easy photographing them, apart from trying not to laugh, I was also being swooped on by several Australian magpies (nesting season), so had to cover myself with a hat, sunnies and scrim scarf. "The corellas looked dirty due to nesting in tree hollows. Little Corellas are one of the funniest and playful birds in Australia. "They are known to hang upside down on powerlines, open streetlight covers, roll over on the ground and so on. However, it was the first time I’ve seen them on a swing.
"I posted this photo online and it was a hit. Australians are aware of corellas’ playful antics and they loved the photo. "One American contacted me and said it was staged because she had never seen wild birds do this (maybe time for her to visit Australia). You can’t ask wild birds to pose in crazy positions. Corellas are like kids, they get up to mischief."
Lea is an award-winning wildlif
Camera IconPic from Lea Scaddan/ Magnus News. Pic shows a pair of Australian Corellas playing on a swing in a children’s playgorund in Perth, WA, on October 8. pictures@magnusnewsagency.com +44(0)1215371514 Magnus News Agency +44(0)1215371514 newsdesk@magnusnewsagency.com THESE AUSTRALIAN BIRDS ARE SURE GETTING INTO THE SWING OF THINGS LARKING AROUND IN A CHILDREN’S PLAYGROUND WITH PIX By Richard Ashmore These birds sure look like they are getting into the SWING of things larking around in a children’s playground. The corellas – which are related to cockatoos – were spotted appearing to push one another on the swing in these images taken in Perth, Western Australia, on October 8. Like their larger cockatoo cousins, corellas are renowned for their playful nature which is so important for a social bird to reinforce relationships. Graphic designer Lea Scaddan was taking some morning bird photographs when she spotted a flock head to the playground. Lea, from Perth, said seeing the two birds on the swing she knew she had to try and get some shots. She said: "It wasn’t easy photographing them, apart from trying not to laugh, I was also being swooped on by several Australian magpies (nesting season), so had to cover myself with a hat, sunnies and scrim scarf. "The corellas looked dirty due to nesting in tree hollows. Little Corellas are one of the funniest and playful birds in Australia. "They are known to hang upside down on powerlines, open streetlight covers, roll over on the ground and so on. However, it was the first time I’ve seen them on a swing. "I posted this photo online and it was a hit. Australians are aware of corellas’ playful antics and they loved the photo. "One American contacted me and said it was staged because she had never seen wild birds do this (maybe time for her to visit Australia). You can’t ask wild birds to pose in crazy positions. Corellas are like kids, they get up to mischief." Lea is an award-winning wildlif Credit: Lea Scaddan/ Magnus News

The combined efforts by Bunbury City Council and Harvey Shire Council to control the introduced corella population seems to have had an effect, with the city’s mayor confirming there had been fewer complaints about the pest species.

Just over 1000 corellas have been culled over the past 10 years as part of previous collaborative approaches with other local governments, with the Harvey shire coming on board last year.

City of Bunbury Mayor Gary Brennan said planning had begun for the upcoming season, with a contractor appointed to undertake control work from January.

“Control work will begin when birds return to the control sites after breeding and a regular attendance pattern at control sites occurs,” Mr Brennan said.

He said while it was difficult to correctly estimate the corella populations due to the large area covered, staff had seen fewer reports from community members.

“We have, however, been monitoring community complaints instead and there has been a big drop in complaints during 2019 compared to 2017 and 2018,” he said.

“We are not sure if this is due to our control efforts in 2018/19 or due to other factors such as changes in bird movement patterns.”

The 2018-2019 program took place from January to June 2019, when the birds left the area for breeding over the winter months.

“Generally speaking, the birds congregate into large flocks over warmer months and disberse for breeding over cooler months,” he said.

“We have undertaken control in locations that have an established bird attendance pattern and are secure so public access can be restricted for safety purposes.”

The Shire of Harvey and the City of Bunbury worked collaboratively during 2018/2019 and Mr Brennan said this would likely continue in 2019/20.

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