Curfew lifted for machinery

Jacinta CantatoreHarvey-Waroona Reporter
Livestock Rural Transporters Association of WA president David Fyfe with Federal Agriculture Minister Bridget McKenzie in Brunswick.
Camera IconLivestock Rural Transporters Association of WA president David Fyfe with Federal Agriculture Minister Bridget McKenzie in Brunswick. Credit: Zach Relph

Industry leaders and livestock transport operators have welcomed the easing of the agricultural vehicle curfew on key routes in the State’s road network.

The State Government announced on Thursday that rules around the movement of oversize agricultural vehicles had been revised in a bid to balance community road safety with industry efficiency.

For the past 15 years a curfew has prevented oversized vehicles from using the road network during the Easter and Christmas periods, clashing with the agricultural industry’s busy seeding and harvest periods.

Changes to the curfew only apply to agricultural vehicles above 5.5m in width and will mean farmers only need to obtain a permit when they need to take an over-mass agricultural combination across a bridge.

Owner of Brunswick-based Wedderburn Transport Mark Talbot said he welcomed the “common-sense move” to lift the curfews.

“As transporters we are aware of agricultural movements and travel through country areas where there could be large machinery sharing the road,” Mr Talbot said.

“As long as the public use the same common sense and awareness I see this as a good move to help farmers.”

Livestock and Rural Transport Association of WA president David Fyfe also welcomed the move.

“We are pleased to see that there is closer monitoring of the movement of agricultural equipment as the equipment must be moved, but it must be done safely,” Mr Fyfe said.

He pointed to communication and being mindful of other vehicle types was the key.

“We would like to see greater communication with the travelling public, especially tourists, to remind them that this is a busy time in Western Australia and to be mindful that they are likely to encounter equipment being moved on rural roads.”

“It is also timely to remind drivers moving equipment to communicate on channel 40 on their radios so that heavy vehicles are aware they are there.”

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