Entry art reflects elders

Jacinta CantatoreHarvey-Waroona Reporter
Australind artists Alex and Nicole Mickle were selected by the council in July to create Australind entry statements as well as a main artwork at the Ridley Place foreshore.
Camera IconAustralind artists Alex and Nicole Mickle were selected by the council in July to create Australind entry statements as well as a main artwork at the Ridley Place foreshore.

Harvey shire staff are in consultation with Wardandi elders from the Australind and Bunbury area to finalise designs for the entry statement artwork for Australind foreshore.

Australind artists Alex and Nicole Mickle were selected by the council in July to create Australind entry statements as well as a main artwork at the Ridley Place foreshore.

The main sculpture and signage at the main entries from Forrest Highway are expected to be installed by the end of the year, with a total cost of about $145,000.

Five of the entry statement signs will include the word Kaya, which is the Noongar word for hello, and further proposals have been made to include the word Wardandi in the gateway sign at the intersection of Buffalo Road and Cathedral Avenue.

Harvey shire chief executive officer Annie Riordan said shire staff wanted to consult with local elders out of respect to the Aboriginal community.

“The artists worked with a local indigenous artist to develop the designs for the entry signs and the designs include an indigenous component,” Ms Riordan said.

“Out of respect for our local indigenous community the shire’s protocol is to consult with local elders on matters such as this to seek their input and comments.”

Ms Riordan said shire council and the entry-statement steering committee had approved the designs subject to consultation and endorsement by the elders.

“The artists are currently finalising the detailed design for the main artwork and will commence construction within the next few weeks,” Ms Riordan said.

The palatinate-aluminium sculpture represents the rippling sand and water of the estuary, as well as settler and Aboriginal heritage.

Safehaven Studio founders Mr and Mrs Mickle have completed numerous other public artworks around the State, including the 5.5m tall Wardandi Boodja sculpture on the Koombana Bay foreshore.

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