$15m water treatment plant to aid city’s growth

Nicolette BarbasSouth Western Times
Water Minister Dave Kelly and Aqwest board chairman Stan Liaros unveil the plaque at the new water treatment plant.
Camera IconWater Minister Dave Kelly and Aqwest board chairman Stan Liaros unveil the plaque at the new water treatment plant. Credit: Henderson Photographics

Ngoora Moolinap is the name given to the new $15 million water treatment plant in Glen Iris which was officially opened yesterday.

Designed to respond to the impacts of climate change and meet the future water supply needs in Bunbury, the new plant will enable Aqwest to continue to supply good quality water to Bunbury and support the city’s growth and development.

“Bunbury’s drinking water is supplied by bores which are much closer to the coast and with the impact of climate change there is a real risk of salt water intrusion into those bores,” Water Minister Dave Kelly said.

“Aqwest have been advocating to get the funds to move their bores inland and ensure Bunbury’s water supply is secure from intrusion for years to come.

“This new plant will ensure a sustainable water supply into the future by moving away from water extraction at coastal bores, which were at risk of salt water intrusion due to the impacts of climate change.”

Water Minister Dave Kelly joined Aqwest CEO Gary Hallsworth and Wardandi Miya-k Kaadadjiny Aboriginal corporation Noongar language specialist Charmaine Councillor at the opening of the $15 million water treatment plant in Glen Iris.
Camera IconWater Minister Dave Kelly joined Aqwest CEO Gary Hallsworth and Wardandi Miya-k Kaadadjiny Aboriginal corporation Noongar language specialist Charmaine Councillor at the opening of the $15 million water treatment plant in Glen Iris. Credit: Nicolette Barbas

Aqwest board chairman Stan Liaros said the board and CEO were keen to ensure the local Aboriginal history of land was recognised, remembered and reflected in the plant.

In collaboration with local Aboriginal Elders, Aqwest named the new plant Ngoora Moolinap Water Treatment Plant (Glen Iris), which means “water sitting in a well” and “swampy place”, and reflects the Aboriginal history of and connection to the land.

“The incorporation of Aboriginal culture into this project was really pleasing to see, I understand there was extensive consultation on a number of things including the name and art work to come,” Mr Kelly said.

“It provides recognition that this land has been occupied by traditional owners and it has been fantastic to have the elders on board.”

The plant has the capacity to supply almost half of Bunbury’s average water consumption demand.

Aboriginal elders joined Water Minister Dave Kelly, Bunbury MLA Don Punch and Aqwest CEO Gary Hallsworth at the official opening of the water treatment plant where a smoking ceremony was held.
Camera IconAboriginal elders joined Water Minister Dave Kelly, Bunbury MLA Don Punch and Aqwest CEO Gary Hallsworth at the official opening of the water treatment plant where a smoking ceremony was held.

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