A rose by another means

Nicolette BarbasSouth Western Times
Four-year-old Connor Barrett was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis at just three weeks old.
Camera IconFour-year-old Connor Barrett was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis at just three weeks old.

This year’s 65 Roses Day will be different to any other with the introduction of a virtual rose garden.

With the COVID-19 pandemic restricting Cystic Fibrosis WA volunteers to hit the pavement with their sea of roses, the organisation has decided to take the campaign online, launching a digital initiative to save their largest annual fundraiser.

CFWA CEO Nigel Barker said that whilst it isn’t business as usual this year, the organisation certainly means business.

“We are asking everyone to buy a digital rose (and get their friends to as well) to raise funds for around 400 people in WA living with cystic fibrosis – around half of which are children,” Mr Barker said.

“Not only will donations go towards the latest research to find a cure, it will help provide vital support services and critical research funding for people with CF.”

Bunbury resident Taryn Barrett’s youngest son Connor has been living with the disorder since three weeks old.

“Connor is a bubbly four-year-old boy who started kindy this year and has the world at his feet, but I am concerned about the impact the pandemic has had on research and support service funding,” she said.

“We have very high hopes for Connor’s life but there is still a long way to go to guarantee him that opportunity to grow old.

“I know COVID-19 is consuming our global resources right now but it scares me to know that cystic fibrosis research may have to slow down.

“Cystic Fibrosis is such a complex disease with many complications so it’s vital that the research continues and that support services are available for those who need them.”

A digital rose can be purchased from rosegarden.org.au and will be sent via email.

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