One woman’s journey in fighting breast cancer

Nicolette BarbasSouth Western Times
Bunbury resident Asharie Bradshaw was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer in 2019.Picture: Nicolette Barbas
Camera IconBunbury resident Asharie Bradshaw was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer in 2019.Picture: Nicolette Barbas

October marks Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which to many serves as a reminder to be aware of the common symptoms of the disease.

In 2015, Bunbury resident Asharie Bradshaw was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer.

She hit it hard and fast in its early stages by going down the path of having lumpectomy, radiation and chemotherapy.

But in 2019, it came back in the other breast.

“When I initially found the lump I was in total disbelief,” Ms Bradshaw said.

“Straight away I went to the worst case scenario in my head and worked my way back, but I needed to do that for myself.

“I have had a bilateral mastectomy, chemotherapy and I am currently on oral chemo for the next six months.”

Ms Bradshaw described herself as a “glass half full” person.

“I’ve always been quite a positive person, even through this whole experience,” she said.

“The best advice I can give is to stay in touch with people.

Accepting help was really hard for me at the start, I was blown away by how much support people were willing to give and I’ve learnt now that if somebody wants to help just let them, they don’t offer if they don’t genuinely mean it.

With two sons, aged 19 and 21, Ms Bradshaw was concerned when she found out she had the BRCA gene.

“It just means my boys have a 50 per cent chance of carrying that gene and you think down the line, what have you passed onto your future grandchildren?,” she said.

“I cannot encourage people enough to get their lumps and bumps checked, even if it’s just to be safe.”

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