Tributes come a lot closer to home

Jackson BarrettBunbury Herald
Picture: Jonah Golds played the Last Post and the Reveille from his driveway in South Bunbury.
Camera IconPicture: Jonah Golds played the Last Post and the Reveille from his driveway in South Bunbury.

Bunbury residents took to the streets to pay their respects on Anzac Day in place of the traditional dawn service at the War Memorial and morning service at the Graham Bricknell Memorial Music Shell.

Residential streets were lined with candles and poppies in commemoration as people came together to hold their own ceremonies.

Young musician Jonah Golds, 15, would normally be playing at schools, RSL functions and football games this week, but on Saturday he led tributes in South Bunbury with a rousing rendition of the Last Post and the Reveille from his home at dawn.

“Music was always an important part of war for a lot of different reasons and it’s also an important part of the community,” Jonah said.

World War II veteran and centenarian Richard “Norm” Eaton also took to his driveway to commemorate Anzac Day surrounded by close family and plenty of neighbours.

“Hopefully we can carry on with more traditional ceremonies from next year, we don’t hope to have another Anzac Day like this,” Mr Eaton said.

Mr Eaton was the guest of honour at Bunbury’s dawn and morning services last year.

The war memorial on Victoria Street looked over an almost empty CBD, with those paying respects or laying wreaths adhering to social distancing regulations.

The Rathmines war memorial in East Bunbury also had wreaths laid at its base.

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