Tradition of Anzacs worth honouring

Nicolette BarbasSouth Western Times
Bunbury RSL president John Gelmi said Anzac Day is, was and always will be a day of remembrance.
Camera IconBunbury RSL president John Gelmi said Anzac Day is, was and always will be a day of remembrance. Credit: Jackson Barrett

This year’s Anzac Day will be unlike any other.

For the first time since World War II there will be no traditional dawn service or mid-morning march.

Instead, Australians will come together to recognise past and present armed services personnel by standing on their driveways or balconies at 5.55am to pay their respects.

During this unprecedented situation, Bunbury Returned and Services League president John Gelmi said it was important people still honoured the fallen.

“It is, was and always will be a day of remembrance,” Mr Gelmi said.

“While the camaraderie of Anzac Day is something the older veterans look forward to each year, it is important we put our health and wellbeing first.

“I urge everyone to make an effort and pay their respect by standing on their driveways or balconies.

“People are still able to lay wreaths and encouraged to do so — adhering to social distancing laws.”

The Bunbury City Council will be providing a wreath for each suburb to be laid by an RSL-nominated representative at the end of a driveway or street.

Bunbury Mayor Gary Brennan said despite the challenges, it was important the community paused and paid its respects on Anzac Day.

“It is important that our community still honours and commemorates those who fought for our country and sacrificed everything,” Mr Brennan said.

“I encourage Bunbury residents to pause and reflect in whatever capacity they can.”

Get the latest news from thewest.com.au in your inbox.

Sign up for our emails